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Agricultural News


Oklahoma Rains Bring Need for Nutrient Management in Wheat and Canola

Mon, 21 Dec 2015 17:42:28 CST

Oklahoma Rains Bring Need for Nutrient Management in Wheat and Canola Oklahoma’s wheat crop has gone into the winter in better shape than previous years. With adequate moisture, the crop has a better stand and early season growth. In having record moisture in November, Oklahoma State University Precision Nutrient Management specialist Dr. Brian Arnall said having more soil moisture changes nutrient management for the winter wheat crop.


“A lot of our crop is using through that nitrogen that was applied early,” Arnall said.


If farmers applied only a starter fertilizer, Arnall said they need to consider making that nitrogen application as soon as the crop begins to dry out. If farmers applied nitrogen prior to planting, he said the crop is probably doing alright, but it will depend on the soil type. In fields with coarse or sandy soils with a lot of bio-mass production, he said those soils that have good drainage will allow for moisture to move nitrates down. Farmers will need to monitor and scout fields regularly. Arnall recommends farmers watch the lower leaves because nitrogen deficiency will show up in the oldest leaves first with yellowing.


Phosphorous levels should be alright, if farmers applied adequate levels. With colder temperatures, Arnall has noticed some fields did not receive adequate phosphorus. He believes there still will be opportunities to apply phosphorus this winter, but time is limited.


The fall weather has been ideal for the state’s canola crop. In going into winter, Arnall said the crop has looked so good, “it’s almost scary”. The slower cool off has allowed canola plants to harden. He said both big and small plants have responded well in going into dormancy, but some stands have suffered due to soil ph and soil phosphorous. As the crop begins to dry out, he recommends farmers make plans to apply nitrogen and sulfur.


Radio Oklahoma Network’s Ron Hays interviewed Arnall. Click or tap on the LISTENBAR below to listen to the full interview

     

Ron Hays interviews OSU’s Brian Arnall
right-click to download mp3

 

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