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Agricultural News


OSU's FAPC Center Releases Its Top 10 Food Safety Tips for the 2018 Chirstmas Holiday Season

Fri, 14 Dec 2018 12:01:27 CST

OSU's FAPC Center Releases Its Top 10 Food Safety Tips for the 2018 Chirstmas Holiday Season The Christmas season is here, and many will be gathering around the dinner table devouring their favorite holiday meals.



Oklahoma State University’s Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center wants to make sure you keep food safety tips in mind when preparing those holiday meals.



“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates each year about 1 in 6 Americans get sick from foodborne diseases,” said Peter Muriana, FAPC food microbiologist. “While the U.S. food supply is one of the safest in the world, food safety during the holidays is a must in order to prevent bacteria from growing and causing illness.”



Muriana suggests the following food safety tips to ensure your holiday meal is not only delicious, but also safe.



1. Shop for holiday foods safely. Buy your meat preferably 1 to 2 days before you cook it, and keep the meat separated from the fresh produce when bagging. Extra caution should be used when buying fresh, stuffed turkeys because of the potential for bacteria growth in the stuffing. Pick up the meat, dairy, eggnog and eggs just before checking out.


2. Develop a master plan. Take into consideration your refrigerator, freezer and oven space to keep hot foods at 140 degrees Fahrenheit or higher and cold foods at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below. If you use coolers, make sure you have plenty of clean ice and check it frequently to make sure the ice has not melted.


3. Wash hands often. Wash hands before, during and after food preparation to minimize bacterial contamination. Wash with hot water and soap up to your wrists and between your fingers for approximately 20 seconds.


4. Separate to avoid cross contamination. Use two cutting boards: one for preparing raw meat, poultry and fish, and the other for cutting fruits and vegetables, cooked food or preparing salads.


5. Wash all fresh produce. Rinse fruits and vegetables thoroughly under cool running water and use a produce brush to remove surface dirt. Even wash prepackaged greens to minimize bacterial contamination.


6. Thaw frozen meats safely. Defrost meats in the refrigerator for approximately 24 hours, depending on size, or submerge meat in its original package in a pan of enough cold water to cover the meat. Allow 30 minutes thawing time for every pound.


7. Cook to proper temperature. Use a thermometer to make sure food has been cooked enough to kill bacteria. Turkey, stuffing, side dishes and all leftovers should be cooked to at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit.


8. Keep guests out of the kitchen. Holidays occur during cold and flu season, and preventing guests from sampling the food while it is being prepared limits the amount of germs getting on the food. Serve appetizers to give guests something to nibble on until the meal is ready.


9. Refrigerate leftovers. Leftovers should be divided into smaller portions, stored in several shallow containers and refrigerated within two hours after cooking. Leftovers should be eaten within 3 to 4 days. If large amounts are left, consider freezing leftovers for later use.


10. Eating leftovers. Reheat leftovers to 165 degrees Fahrenheit throughout or until steaming hot. Soups, sauces and gravies should be brought to a rolling boil for at least 1 minute. Never taste leftover food that looks or smells strange. When in doubt, throw it out.


For more food safety information, visit http://fapc.biz/videos/food-safety/2018-holiday-food-safety or text FAPC to 80802 to download the FAPC Connect app.



FAPC, a part of OSU’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, helps to discover, develop and deliver technical and business information that stimulates and supports the growth of value-added food and agricultural products and processing in Oklahoma.



Source - Oklahoma State University’s Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center



   

 

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