OSU to host pecan pest management workshop Feb. 21

Pest management techniques will be the focus of the upcoming 2023 Pecan Pest Management Workshop slated for Feb. 21. (Photo by OSU Agricultural Communications Services)

By Trisha Gedon

Consumers may think about pecans when they’re ready to make a pecan pie or other tasty treat, but this nut is always on the minds of producers in the pecan industry.

Oklahoma pecan producers will focus on pest control in the orchard at the 2023 Pecan Pest Management Workshop from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Feb. 21 at the Gordon Cooper Technology Center, 1 John C. Bruton Dr., in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Registration is free but required by Feb. 17.

“Oklahoma ranks second in native pecan production and fifth in overall production, so this is an important agricultural crop,” said Becky Carroll, Oklahoma State University Extension associate specialist for fruits and pecans. “With increased prices for management inputs, such as pesticides and fertilizers, producers are looking for ways to better manage their crops and increase profitability.”

Using Integrated Pest Management methods of scouting and monitoring for pests, producers can better target pest management or eliminate sprays when not needed. Carroll said it’s beneficial for producers to know what’s going on in the orchard or grove and how to identify these issues before they become big problems and affect profit margins.

“This workshop, led by OSU and industry specialists, will demonstrate pest management methods, discover potential new products and learn effective ways to use them when needed,” she said.

Continuing education units are available in categories 1A and 10 for private pesticide applicators. Licensees should have their applicator number available when signing in at the workshop.

Participants are responsible for lunch, and door prizes will be given throughout the day.

For more information, contact Carroll at 405-744-6139 or email becky.carroll@okstate.edu.

OSU Extension uses research-based information to help all Oklahomans solve local issues and concerns, promote leadership and manage resources wisely throughout the state’s 77 counties. Most information is available at little to no cost.